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Vladislav Rybakov
Vladislav Rybakov

SuperMidi, MIDI Player & Converter, and Sweet MIDI Converter: The Best Tools to Convert Type 1 MIDI to Type 0 for Mac



How to Convert Type 1 MIDI to Type 0 for Mac




If you are a music producer, composer, or enthusiast, you probably have encountered MIDI files at some point. MIDI stands for Musical Instrument Digital Interface, and it is a standard that allows electronic musical instruments, computers, and other devices to communicate and exchange musical data.




Convert Type 1 Midi To Type 0 For Mac



MIDI files are not audio files, but rather sequences of instructions that tell a device how to play a piece of music. For example, a MIDI file can contain information such as which notes to play, when to play them, how loud to play them, and what instrument to use.


However, not all MIDI files are the same. There are different types of MIDI files that have different structures and features. In this article, we will focus on two common types of MIDI files: Type 1 and Type 0. We will explain what they are, why you might need to convert them, and how to do it on your Mac using three different software applications.


What is MIDI and why do you need to convert it?




MIDI basics




MIDI was developed in the early 1980s as a way to connect different electronic musical instruments and devices together. It was originally designed for synthesizers, but later expanded to include other instruments such as keyboards, drum machines, samplers, sequencers, and computers.


MIDI allows these devices to send and receive messages that control various aspects of musical performance, such as pitch, velocity, duration, timbre, modulation, expression, and synchronization.


MIDI does not transmit any sound or audio data, but rather codes that represent musical events. These codes are then interpreted by a device that has a sound generator or a synthesizer that produces the actual sounds.


MIDI can be transmitted through different channels or ports, each of which can carry up to 16 tracks or parts of music. Each track or part can have its own instrument or sound assigned to it. For example, you can have a piano track on channel 1, a bass track on channel 2, a drum track on channel 10, and so on.


MIDI file types




MIDI files are files that store MIDI data in a standardized format that can be read by different devices and software applications. There are three main types of MIDI files: SMF0 (Standard MIDI File type 0), SMF1 (Standard MIDI File type 1), and SMF2 (Standard MIDI File type 2).


The difference between these types lies in how they organize the tracks or parts of music within the file. Here is a brief overview of each type:


  • SMF0: All the tracks or parts are merged into one single track or part. This means that all the MIDI messages are mixed together and share the same time base. This type of file is simple and compact, but it does not allow for much flexibility or editing.



  • SMF1: Each track or part is stored separately within the file. This means that each track or part can have its own MIDI messages and time base. This type of file is more complex and larger, but it allows for more flexibility and editing.



  • SMF2: Each track or part can have multiple sub-tracks or sub-parts within the file. This means that each track or part can have different MIDI messages and time bases for different sections of music. This type of file is the most complex and largest, but it allows for the most flexibility and editing.



In this article, we will focus on the two most common types of MIDI files: SMF0 and SMF1, which are also known as Type 0 and Type 1 respectively.


Reasons to convert Type 1 to Type 0




Type 1 MIDI files are generally preferred over Type 0 MIDI files because they offer more advantages, such as:


  • They can store multiple tracks or parts of music, each with its own instrument or sound, which can create richer and more diverse musical arrangements.



  • They can preserve the original structure and organization of the music, which can make it easier to edit, modify, or rearrange later.



  • They can support more advanced features and functions, such as tempo changes, time signatures, lyrics, markers, meta-events, and system exclusive messages.



However, there are some situations where you might need to convert Type 1 MIDI files to Type 0 MIDI files, such as:


  • You want to play the MIDI file on a device or software application that only supports Type 0 MIDI files. For example, some older synthesizers, sequencers, or players may not be able to read Type 1 MIDI files.



  • You want to reduce the size of the MIDI file by merging all the tracks or parts into one. For example, some devices or software applications may have limited memory or storage capacity that cannot handle large Type 1 MIDI files.



  • You want to simplify the MIDI file by removing unnecessary or redundant tracks or parts. For example, some devices or software applications may not be able to handle complex Type 1 MIDI files with too many tracks or parts.



In any case, converting Type 1 MIDI files to Type 0 MIDI files is not a difficult task, especially if you have a Mac computer and some handy software applications. In the next sections, we will show you how to do it using three different software applications: SuperMidi, MIDI Player & Converter, and Sweet MIDI Converter.


How to convert Type 1 MIDI to Type 0 for Mac using SuperMidi




What is SuperMidi and how does it work?




SuperMidi is a free and open-source software application that allows you to convert, edit, play, and record MIDI files on your Mac. It supports both Type 0 and Type 1 MIDI files, as well as other formats such as MP3, WAV, AIFF, OGG, FLAC, and M4A. It also has a built-in synthesizer that can generate sounds from various instruments and soundfonts.


SuperMidi works by reading the MIDI data from the input file and processing it according to your settings and preferences. You can choose which tracks or parts to include or exclude in the output file, as well as adjust the volume, pan, reverb, chorus, tempo, pitch bend range, and other parameters for each track or part. You can also add new tracks or parts by recording your own performance using a keyboard or a mouse. Once you are satisfied with the result, you can save the output file in your desired format and location.


Step-by-step guide to convert Type 1 MIDI to Type 0 for Mac using SuperMidi




To convert Type 1 MIDI to Type 0 for Mac using SuperMidi, follow these steps:


  • Download SuperMidi from its official website here. The latest version is SuperMidi v2.6.2 as of June 2023.



  • Install SuperMidi on your Mac by dragging the SuperMidi.app file to the Applications folder. You may need to grant permission to open the app by going to System Preferences > Security & Privacy > General and clicking on Open Anyway.



  • Launch SuperMidi and click on File > Open to browse and select the Type 1 MIDI file that you want to convert. You can also drag and drop the file onto the SuperMidi window.